racism

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Sixty years is plenty to forget the most stark lessons against racism

(Talking about Germany, here, i don't know that the U.S. can be said to have learned in the first place from its centuries of extreme, institutionalized racism and their aftermaths.)

The German chancellor, Angela Merkel, has courted growing anti-immigrant opinion in Germany by claiming the country's attempts to create a multicultural society have "utterly failed".

Speaking to a meeting of young members of her Christian Democratic Union party, Merkel said the idea of people from different cultural backgrounds living happily "side by side" did not work.

On our post-racial society

"Race 2 the Bottom" by Keith Knight
http://www.buzzle.com/showImage.asp?image=51656

Dad on: racism; women and youth in civil rights; nonviolence and boxing

John C. Melançon

Was a member of the NAACP. Thought it was too conservative then.

In the South, most of the racist had a few blacks they new that if you included them they would say “Now wait, they are different.”

Person (minister) he worked with worked in the city slums and as he learned all of these people came from some little spot in the country he thought - we’re in the wrong place. Opened some thing with greek name.

Says it is women who did hardest work in civil rights movement.

Try hard enough to find a job: race and reality in the U.S.

http://coanews.org/article/2008/what-dead-presidents-can-do

Excerpts:

Dead Presidents is the story of a black veteran who -- upon returning to The Bronx after volunteering for two tours in Vietnam -- robs an armored car with his fellow vets since he can't find a living wage job that'll allow him to support a family. The acting, the soundtrack -- everything about this motion picture is perfect, but after [a romantic interest] saw it for the first time with me, all [she] had to say was, "I don't think Anthony [the protagonist] tried hard enough to find a job."

Turned down job in South Africa

Dad was offered a good job in South Africa, he said. He was interested and then "What was I thinking?" he said. "If the situation in this country bothers me so..."

"It haunts me to this day"

In Philadelphia, Dad answered a job ad, he was probably about 16, he said.

There was another boy there, an African-American, a real go-getter. [Who looked like he really expected to get the job.]

Coming out of the interview where Dad got the job, it came to him that the other boy was not going to get the job.

It haunts me to this day. This very moment it haunts me.

Roland G. Fryer Jr. and thoughts on economic injustice, racism, and achievement that are no fault of the fine man

A 2005 article on hot young economist Roland G. Fryer Jr. by Stephen J. Dubner got me thinking about my thesis again.

About all I need to know to want to keep track of his work is that his model is W.E.B. DuBois.

But this statement is disturbing, and the author is an economist himself. Following up on examples of Fryer's willingness and capacity to look at all things that might affect black achievement, including genetics, Dubner wrote:

So here is Fryer's final anomaly: he is a man who revels in his blackness and yet also says he believes, as DuBois believed, that black underachievement cannot entirely be laid at the feet of discrimination.

What sort of fool, let alone a self-described rogue economist, would frame the question as a matter of discrimination? Kidnapping and slavery and no compensation hardly fit neatly under discrimination. Follow history a tad longer and you get to sharecropping, which puts the problem squarely in an economic context.

Make wealth and resources equal, and I bet black people will overcome racism – with great difficulty, but ultimately overcome it – and achieve just about anything professors and bureaucrats care to measure.

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